ASCII vs. Unicode vs. UTF-7 vs. UTF-8 vs. UTF-32 vs. ANSI

ASCII vs. Unicode vs. UTF-7 vs. UTF-8 vs. UTF-32 vs. ANSI

Here’s the difference between ASCII, Unicode, UTF-7, UTF-8, UTF-32, and ANSI. Have you ever wondered about this HTML tag: <meta charset=”UTF-8″>? With the help of this article, you will not only make sense of it, but also learn: What ASCII, Unicode, UTF-7, UTF-8, UTF-32, and ANSI are What’s the difference between them Lots more Let’s dive right in! What Is the Difference Between ASCII, Unicode, UTF-7, UTF-8, UTF-32, and ANSI? In your travels, you’ve likely seen at least one of the terms ASCII, Unicode, UTF-7, UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-32, and ANSI. However, what you may be less familiar with is the actual difference between these seven terms. Navigating the battle of ASCII vs. Unicode vs. UTF-7 vs. UTF-8 vs. UTF-16 vs. UTF-32 vs. ANSI and what they’re best for or used for can be a complicated journey. But, fear not, it’s not impossible to understand. To fully understand these terms, it’s good to start with a “picture this.” Why Are We Even Here? Picture a typewriter. You probably know how one looks. Now, picture a typewriter hammer.  If you’ve never seen a typewriter hammer, it’s a tiny rectangle with a character on the top and the bottom. The hammer often has lowercase and uppercase letters, but sometimes digits and symbols. In the days of typewriters, the characters available to you were what you saw on the keyboard. This number of characters was the number of keys on the keyboard, plus the extra character on top of the type hammer.  You acquired extra characters by literally “shifting” the typebars to change the alignment of where the key punched and get a new character. With computer keyboards, character sets can go beyond what’s mechanically possible of a keyboard. You know that modern computer keyboards accommodate far more than that. But, on early computers, your choice of characters wasn’t much better than a typewriter. The original American standard of characters only had 128 characters, and

ASCII: What Is ASCII and What Is ASCII Used For? (PDF File)

ASCII: What Is ASCII and What Is ASCII Used For?

Here’s what ASCII is and how it’s used: Computers use ASCII, a table of characters. The English alphabet, numbers, and other common symbols are encoded in the ASCII table as binary code. The characters in computers are not stored as characters but as series of binary bits: 1s and 0s. For example, 01000001 means “A” because ASCII says so. If you want to learn all about ASCII, then you are in the right place. Let’s get started! Ever Heard ASCII? American Standard Code for Information Interchange is a method of character encoding used in electronic communication. That’s the short ASCII definition—but there’s way more to say on the topic, as this guide will show you. Since the full name is quite a mouthful, the term is usually abbreviated simply to ASCII. You may also see it referred to as US-ASCII. That’s the term preferred by the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority, IANA. The standard ASCII code serves telecommunications devices, computers, and other technology. Most of the modern character-encoding schemes used today are rooted in ASCII such as UTF-8 and ISO-8859-1. This guide explains what ASCII code is, how it’s used, why it’s important, the history of ASCII, and its purposes today. What Is ASCII? So just what is ASCII code? First, a reminder of what ASCII stands for: American Standard Code for Information Interchange. By the way, ASCII is pronounced “as-key” (just in case you ever have to say it aloud). Now that you’ve got the terminology down, on to your question. ASCII is a standard coding system that assigns numbers, letters, and symbols to the 256 slots in an 8-bit code—you’ll learn further below what 8-bit exactly is. The ASCII decimal is made up of binary, the language used by computers. ASCII corresponds to the English alphabet. The basic ASCII table includes 128 characters specified into 7-bit integers. It’s possible to print 95 of the encoded characters. These include digits like

ASCII to HTML Conversion Table: Complete (PDF File)

ASCII to HTML Conversion Table: Complete

The complete ASCII to HTML conversion table. This ASCII to HTML table contains all 256 ASCII characters and their HTML counterparts. So if you want to get the complete ASCII to HTML conversion table, then this article is for you. Let’s get started! What Is ASCII in a Nutshell? Have you ever stopped to wonder how your computer works? You may know that computers use binary (combinations of the numbers zero and one) to store information, but how does that translate into the comprehensive text you read on your screen? The answer lies with ASCII. ASCII Explained ASCII stands for the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. Essentially, it is the computer’s own language. Computers have a seven-digit code to represent each letter, number, and punctuation. This code is binary, so it only uses a combination of zeros and ones.  For example, the bits (binary digits) for a capital A are 01000001, while the bits for a lowercase A are 01100001.  If you counted how many digits there are, you might be confused about why there are eight digits instead of seven. Well, each byte in the standard ASCII starts with zero, so the following seven digits are those that differentiate the characters. ASCII has codes for 255 characters. Instead of remembering the byte for each letter, symbol, and number, the founders organized them numerically and assigned them a decimal value. For example, capital A (as mentioned above) is number 65, while the lowercase A is 97.  ASCII Sections To further organize these codes, the founders separated the characters into two sections, which later became three as people developed codes for more specialized characters.  The first ASCII section is a control group that contains unprintable characters. There are a total of 32 characters in this subgroup, labeled from 0 to 31. These unprintable numbers are only to control different external devices, like a keyboard or a printer.  In the next

ASCII to Octal Conversion Table: Complete (PDF File)

ASCII to Hex Conversion Table: Complete

The complete ASCII to hex conversion table. This ASCII to hex table contains all 256 ASCII characters and their hex counterparts. So if you want to get the complete ASCII to hex conversion table, then this article is for you. Let’s get started! What Is ASCII in a Nutshell? Have you ever stopped to wonder how your computer works? You may know that computers use binary (combinations of the numbers zero and one) to store information, but how does that translate into the comprehensive text you read on your screen? The answer lies with ASCII. ASCII Explained ASCII stands for the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. Essentially, it is the computer’s own language. Computers have a seven-digit code to represent each letter, number, and punctuation. This code is binary, so it only uses a combination of zeros and ones.  For example, the bits (binary digits) for a capital A are 01000001, while the bits for a lowercase A are 01100001.  If you counted how many digits there are, you might be confused about why there are eight digits instead of seven. Well, each byte in the standard ASCII starts with zero, so the following seven digits are those that differentiate the characters. ASCII has codes for 255 characters. Instead of remembering the byte for each letter, symbol, and number, the founders organized them numerically and assigned them a decimal value. For example, capital A (as mentioned above) is number 65, while the lowercase A is 97.  ASCII Sections To further organize these codes, the founders separated the characters into two sections, which later became three as people developed codes for more specialized characters.  The first ASCII section is a control group that contains unprintable characters. There are a total of 32 characters in this subgroup, labeled from 0 to 31. These unprintable numbers are only to control different external devices, like a keyboard or a printer.  In the next

ASCII to Octal Conversion Table: Complete (PDF File)

ASCII to Octal Conversion Table: Complete

The complete ASCII to octal conversion table. This ASCII to octal table contains all 256 ASCII characters and their octal counterparts. So if you want to get the complete ASCII to octal conversion table, then this article is for you. Let’s get started! What Is ASCII in a Nutshell? Have you ever stopped to wonder how your computer works? You may know that computers use binary (combinations of the numbers zero and one) to store information, but how does that translate into the comprehensive text you read on your screen? The answer lies with ASCII. ASCII Explained ASCII stands for the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. Essentially, it is the computer’s own language. Computers have a seven-digit code to represent each letter, number, and punctuation. This code is binary, so it only uses a combination of zeros and ones.  For example, the bits (binary digits) for a capital A are 01000001, while the bits for a lowercase A are 01100001.  If you counted how many digits there are, you might be confused about why there are eight digits instead of seven. Well, each byte in the standard ASCII starts with zero, so the following seven digits are those that differentiate the characters. ASCII has codes for 255 characters. Instead of remembering the byte for each letter, symbol, and number, the founders organized them numerically and assigned them a decimal value. For example, capital A (as mentioned above) is number 65, while the lowercase A is 97.  ASCII Sections To further organize these codes, the founders separated the characters into two sections, which later became three as people developed codes for more specialized characters.  The first ASCII section is a control group that contains unprintable characters. There are a total of 32 characters in this subgroup, labeled from 0 to 31. These unprintable numbers are only to control different external devices, like a keyboard or a printer.  In the next

ASCII to Decimal Conversion Table: Complete (PDF File)

ASCII to Decimal Conversion Table: Complete

The complete ASCII to decimal conversion table. This ASCII to decimal table contains all 256 ASCII characters and their decimal counterparts. So if you want to get the complete ASCII to decimal conversion table, then this article is for you. Let’s get started! What Is ASCII in a Nutshell? Have you ever stopped to wonder how your computer works? You may know that computers use binary (combinations of the numbers zero and one) to store information, but how does that translate into the comprehensive text you read on your screen? The answer lies with ASCII. ASCII Explained ASCII stands for the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. Essentially, it is the computer’s own language. Computers have a seven-digit code to represent each letter, number, and punctuation. This code is binary, so it only uses a combination of zeros and ones.  For example, the bits (binary digits) for a capital A are 01000001, while the bits for a lowercase A are 01100001.  If you counted how many digits there are, you might be confused about why there are eight digits instead of seven. Well, each byte in the standard ASCII starts with zero, so the following seven digits are those that differentiate the characters. ASCII has codes for 255 characters. Instead of remembering the byte for each letter, symbol, and number, the founders organized them numerically and assigned them a decimal value. For example, capital A (as mentioned above) is number 65, while the lowercase A is 97.  ASCII Sections To further organize these codes, the founders separated the characters into two sections, which later became three as people developed codes for more specialized characters.  The first ASCII section is a control group that contains unprintable characters. There are a total of 32 characters in this subgroup, labeled from 0 to 31. These unprintable numbers are only to control different external devices, like a keyboard or a printer.  In the next

ASCII to Binary Conversion Table: Complete (PDF File)

ASCII to Binary Conversion Table: Complete

Here’s the complete ASCII to binary conversion table. This ASCII to binary table contains all 256 ASCII characters and their binary counterparts. So if you want to get the complete ASCII to binary conversion table, then this article is for you. Let’s get started! What Is ASCII in a Nutshell? Have you ever stopped to wonder how your computer works? You may know that computers use binary (combinations of the numbers zero and one) to store information, but how does that translate into the comprehensive text you read on your screen? The answer lies with ASCII. ASCII Explained ASCII stands for the American Standard Code for Information Interchange. Essentially, it is the computer’s own language. Computers have a seven-digit code to represent each letter, number, and punctuation. This code is binary, so it only uses a combination of zeros and ones.  For example, the bits (binary digits) for a capital A are 01000001, while the bits for a lowercase A are 01100001.  If you counted how many digits there are, you might be confused about why there are eight digits instead of seven. Well, each byte in the standard ASCII starts with zero, so the following seven digits are those that differentiate the characters. ASCII has codes for 255 characters. Instead of remembering the byte for each letter, symbol, and number, the founders organized them numerically and assigned them a decimal value. For example, capital A (as mentioned above) is number 65, while the lowercase A is 97.  ASCII Sections To further organize these codes, the founders separated the characters into two sections, which later became three as people developed codes for more specialized characters.  The first ASCII section is a control group that contains unprintable characters. There are a total of 32 characters in this subgroup, labeled from 0 to 31. These unprintable numbers are only to control different external devices, like a keyboard or a printer.  In the